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So you’ve made all the squares for your Marine Life blanket, maybe you’ve even made a few of the bonus squares, and you’ve got them all prepped and ready for joining…so now what? At this point, you have two options:

– OR –

  • join me in making sets of interlocking “thick border” panels

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If you love the look of these decorative panels, you’re not alone! This is probably my favorite part of the entire Marine Life blanket. I love the ripple effect of the stitch, and I am particularly fond of the Petrol color I picked to use for these panels. Very ocean-y, don’t you think?

This week, in Part 14 of the CAL, I’m going to show you how to make these interlocking panels using the Raised Ripple stitch. I know it looks and sounds a bit complicated, but I promise that it’s easier than it seems!

Fallen a bit behind? No worries! You can find all of the parts of this blanket on the main project page here.

If you’re ready to start your Raised Ripple stitch panels, scroll down this page to read more!

The Rock Disney GIF by Moana


Decorative Raised Ripple Stitch Panels

I knew when I first started planning this project that I wanted to add some decorative panels in between all of my squares. After thumbing through a stitch dictionary, I came across the Raised Ripple stitch, and I knew it would be just perfect for this project!

You’re friends and loved ones will be really impressed with the complexity that the Raised Ripple stitch adds to this blanket, and you don’t even have to tell them that this stitch was very easy to do!

To make the Raised Ripple stitch, you basically just alternate between Front Post Double Crochets and regular Double Crochet stitches, and then alternate the order of those stitches row by row. This offsets your FPTC stitches row by row, which then gives you that raised ripple effect, hence the name.

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Planning/Arranging the Panels

After I figured out that I’d be arranging my squares into a grid 3 squares wide by 4 squares tall, I started to plan how I wanted my interlocking panels to look. After a few drafts, this is the arrangement I came up with:

Ripple Stitch Diagram
Above: interlocking Ripple Stitch panels appear as the teal-colored rectangles and the striped white/grey squares represent the square designs that make up the bulk of the blanket.

Note: If you are arranging your squares differently than I have, or if you are adding/removing squares to your blanket, my exact instructions for making the Raised Ripple stitch panels won’t quite work for you. Don’t worry though: I’ll share some tips on how to adjust them later on.

You’ll notice that many of these rectangular panels are the same size–and you’re correct! To make all of the panels for this blanket, you really just need to make three different sizes of panels:

  1. a long horizontal panel size (goes along the top and bottom of the blanket)
  2. a tall, skinny vertical panel size (forms the outer edges and inner columns of the blanket)
  3. a short horizontal panel size (divides the rows of the squares)

I have written out row-by-row pattern instructions for each of these types of panels in the next section of this post. For tips on changing the sizes of these panels, keep scrolling down this on this page!

In the photos below, I’ve highlighted each of these types of panels from the numbered list above in yellow. You will need 2 of panel type #1, 4 of panel type #2, and 9 of panel type #3.

Note that if this is your first time working with the Raised Ripple stitch, you may find it easier to start with panel type #2.

Ripple Stitch Diagram 2
Panel Type #1
Ripple Stitch Diagram 3
Panel Type #2
Ripple Stitch Diagram 4
Panel Type #3

Stitch Guide

To make these interlocking decorative panels, you’ll need to know how to make the chain stitch (ch), the double crochet stitch (dc), and the front post treble crochet (fptc). If you need help, take a look at the video tutorial below!

Raised Ripple Stitch Tutorial

This stitch is pretty simple once you get the hang of it, but it can be a little tricky if you’ve never worked with it before. To help, I’ve put together a video tutorial! In the video below, I’ll show you how to work rows 1-5 of decorative panel type #2.

Pattern: Decorative Panel Type #1 (Make 2)

To begin, chain 225.

Row 1) Starting in the 4th chain space from the hook, dc (counts as 1st dc of the row), and in every chain st of the row. (223 sts)

Row 2) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 221 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (223 sts)

Row 3) Turn and ch 3 (counts as the 1st dc of the row). Skip the first sc, *skip next sc, work 1 fptc around the dc in the row below the skipped sc, dc in next st* – repeat all the way across the row, working the last dc into the turning chain of the row below. (223 sts)

Row 4) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 221 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (223 sts)

Row 5) Turn and ch 3 (counts as the 1st fptc of the row). Skip the first sc, *dc in next st, skip next sc, work 1 fptc * – repeat all the way across the row, working the last fptc around the turning chain of the row below. (223 sts)

Row 6) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 221 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (223 sts)

Rows 7-10) Repeat rows 3-6 one more time.

Row 11) Repeat row 3 one more time.

You should end up with 5 rows of ripples.

To finish the panel, sc all the way around the panel. Tip: if the vertical sides of your panel seem to bunch up, try working 2 sc per row along the vertical sides and 1 sc per stitch along the horizontal sides.

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Pattern: Decorative Panel Type #2 (Make 4)

To begin, chain 19.

Row 1) Starting in the 4th chain space from the hook, dc (counts as 1st dc of the row), and in every chain st of the row. (17 sts)

Row 2) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 16 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (17sts)

Row 3) Turn and ch 3 (counts as the 1st dc of the row). Skip the first sc, *skip next sc, work 1 fptc around the dc in the row below the skipped sc, dc in next st* – repeat all the way across the row, working the last dc into the turning chain of the row below.(17 sts)

Row 4) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 16 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (17sts)

Row 5) Turn and ch 3 (counts as the 1st fptc of the row). Skip the first sc, *dc in next st, skip next sc, work 1 fptc * – repeat all the way across the row, working the last fptc around the turning chain of the row below. (17 sts)

Row 6) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 16 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (17sts)

Rows 7-230) Repeat rows 3-6 another 56 times.

Row 231) Repeat row 3 one more time.

You should end up with 115 rows of ripples.

To finish the panel, sc all the way around the panel. Tip: if the vertical sides of your panel seem to bunch up, try working 2 sc per row along the vertical sides and 1 sc per stitch along the horizontal sides.

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Pattern: Decorative Panel Type #3 (Make 9)

To begin, chain 61.

Row 1) Starting in the 4th chain space from the hook, dc (counts as 1st dc of the row), and in every chain st of the row. (59 sts)

Row 2) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 58 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (59 sts)

Row 3) Turn and ch 3 (counts as the 1st dc of the row). Skip the first sc, *skip next sc, work 1 fptc around the dc in the row below the skipped sc, dc in next st* – repeat all the way across the row, working the last dc into the turning chain of the row below. (59 sts)

Row 4) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 58 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (59 sts)

Row 5) Turn and ch 3 (counts as the 1st fptc of the row). Skip the first sc, *dc in next st, skip next sc, work 1 fptc * – repeat all the way across the row, working the last fptc around the turning chain of the row below. (59 sts)

Row 6) Turn and ch 1 (counts as 1st sc of the row). 58 sc, then sc into the turning chain. (59 sts)

Rows 7-10) Repeat rows 3-6 one more time.

Row 11) Repeat row 3 one more time.

You should end up with 5 rows of ripples.

To finish the panel, sc all the way around the panel. Tip: if the vertical sides of your panel seem to bunch up, try working 2 sc per row along the vertical sides and 1 sc per stitch along the horizontal sides.

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What if my blanket isn’t arranged the same as yours? How do I change these panels to match?

If your Marine Life blanket features more or fewer squares than mine, or if they’re laid out in a different arrangement, that’s okay!

Adjusting these panels to fit your unique blanket is actually pretty simple. All you need to do is to figure out:

  • how thick of a border panel you want in between each square
  • how long each border panel needs to be

I recommend you start by making a row of foundation single crochet stitches that is as wide as you need your panel to be. Make sure you have an odd number of stitches!

Then, you need to adjust the pattern instructions for the panels (listed above this section of the post) to match that width. To work with the raised ripple stitch, you need an odd number of crochet stitches PLUS two additional stitches for your foundation/turning chain. Then you just need to figure out how many rows high your ripple stitch panels need to be in order to get the correct height.

I also recommend that you lay your squares out and try to measure your desired height and width of each panel “gap” that you need to fill. If it helps, try pinning your squares to blocking boards so that they are all laid out in your desired arrangement, leaving empty spaces in between them to serve as placeholders for your soon-to-be ripple stitch panels. Make your sample foundation single crochets to match the width of each of these “gaps”, then figure out how many rows you need to fill the entire gap.

This is exactly what I did to try and figure out the dimensions of my panels so that they would fit with my blanket. If I can do it, I know you can too! Good luck!


What to Do After You Finish Your Raised Ripple Stitch Panels

These panels take a while to work up, but they add so much extra depth to the blanket that I think they are so worth it!

Once you’ve made all of the panels, and after you’ve worked a sc border around all four sides of each panel, it’s time to block them! You can use any method of blocking you prefer–I recommend wet blocking.

Tip: You’ll probably also want to block all of your squares (if you haven’t done so already). If you have a mesh garment bag large enough, you can very easily toss them all into the washing machine and then block them all together! After that, you’ll be ready to start joining your squares and your panels together, which we’ll talk about next week in Part 15, the final part of the CAL.

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This mesh garment bag is “sweater-sized” and it’s what I use for blocking all of my blanket squares! I find that it’s the easiest way to prep my squares for the blocking process.

I’d love to see photos of your progress as you work on this project! Feel free to share on social media using the hashtag #marinelifecal.

Part 15 will be posted on Friday, December 21st.

 

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